Need Help?

Search our site

LDN Books

Mar. 8, 2007

Posted by Jane Anderson under Uncategorized, Daily Journal

The Promise Of Low Dose Naltrexone Therapy: Potential Benefits in Cancer, Autoimmune, Neurological and Infectious Disorders

Its target audience is geared to physicians.

Written by Elaine Moore, a long time LDN activist, and co-authored by SammyJo Wilkinson, this is the blurb for the book at Amazon:

Naltrexone is an opiate antagonist drug developed in the 1970s and approved by the FDA in 1984 for opiate and drug abuse treatment. When used at much lower doses in an off-label protocol referred to as low dose naltrexone (LDN), the drug has been shown to halt disease progression in Crohn's disease and certain cancers, to reduce symptoms in multiple sclerosis and autism, and to improve numerous autoimmune and neurodegenerative conditions, including Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).
Grounded in clinical and scientific research, this book describes the history of naltrexone, its potential therapeutic uses, its effects on the immune system, its pharmacological properties, and how the drug is administered. It also lists fillers and compounding pharmacies, doctors who prescribe LDN, and patient resources, and includes interviews with LDN patients and researchers.

Mar. 8, 2007

Posted by Jane Anderson under Uncategorized, Daily Journal

Google LDN

Its target audience is geared to physicians and lay people alike.

Written by JOseph Wouk, this is the blurb for the book at Barnes and Noble:

The book begins as a journal entitled, PLACEBO - A Rationalist Seeks a Miracle Cure. Wouk, a hardened western rationalist has no patience for spooks or spirits or any other new age wishful thinking. His plan is to try to delude himself with psychedelics into thinking he is cured - Thereby activating the placebo effect to cure himself for real.

He covers all the bases: From Buddhism to Judaism. From quantum physics to G?del's incompleteness theorem. From alternative medicine to the Metaphysics of Quality.

Told with humor and honesty, Wouk pulls the reader through his thought processes as he watches his mind dissolve from the subcortical dementia caused by his particular variety of MS. Right before he is scheduled to leave for Peru, all his MS symptoms suddenly disappear. The only drug he was taking was Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN).

The second part of the book is entitled: LDN - Miracle Cure Found ! After his symptoms disappear, Wouk finds out that LDN has been stopping the progress of Progressive MS for 20 years. It also has been helping cancer victims, AIDS patients, Parkinson's sufferers, and a host of other immune system related diseases.

Naltrexone was FDA approved only to treat recovering addicts. The low dose version works its magic by tripling the body's production of endorphins. This restores the immune system to full operation; hence the drug's ability to help so many diseases. It doesn't fight the diseases; the body fights them once the immune system is restored. Because it is now generic, no one will spend the millions required for FDA approval.

Google LDN ! is Wouk's attempt at Dana Paramita, the Buddhist version of Christian "goodworks".

The book includes a hundred page appendix with the most up to date information about LDN and its effects on immune system related diseases.

Posted by Jane Anderson under Samples
Trackback URI | No Comments | Permalink

Health Case Studies of Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN) in the treatment of a range of diseases

This book was being distributed free of charge as a PDF file. It is put out by some wonderful people in Australia and is full of moving stories of how LDN has helped people.

Joe Wouk decided to pay to have it made available as a trade paperback. It can be purchased at cost ($7.42) at:
http://www.lulu.com/author/content_revise.php?fCID=3589918
It is a free download at:
Those Who Suffer Much Know Much -- LDN Book

Mar. 8, 2007

Posted by Jane Anderson under Uncategorized, Daily Journal

Children With Starving Brains

Its target audience is geared to physicians.

Written by Jaquelyn McCandless, this is the blurb for the book at Barnes and Noble:

In the midst of a worldwide epidemic of autism, ADD and ADHD, this book is a message of hope to parents embarking on the challenging journey of finding proper medical care for their Autism Spectrum Disorder children. This is the first book written by an experienced clinician that gives a step-by-step treatment guide for parents and doctors based on the understanding that ASD is a complex biomedical illness resulting in significant brain malnutrition. Genetic susceptibility activated by ?triggers? such as pesticides and heavy metals in vaccines can lead to immune system impairment, gut dysfunction, and pathogen invasion such as yeast and viruses in many children. Dr. McCandless, whose grandchild with autism has inspired her ?broad spectrum approach,? describes important diagnostic tools needed to select appropriate treatment programs. Her book explains major therapies newly available and identifies safe and effective options for parents and physicians working together to improve the health of these special children.
Grounded in clinical and scientific research, this book describes the history of naltrexone, its potential therapeutic uses, its effects on the immune system, its pharmacological properties, and how the drug is administered. It also lists fillers and compounding pharmacies, doctors who prescribe LDN, and patient resources, and includes interviews with LDN patients and researchers.

Mar. 8, 2007

Posted by Jane Anderson under Uncategorized, Daily Journal

Up the Creek with a Paddle: Beat MS and Many Autoimmune Disorders with Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN)

Its target audience is geared to physicians and lay people alike.

Written by Mary Anne Boyle Bardley, this is the blurb for the book at Barnes and Noble:

Synopsis The story is simple. It is about love, life and hope. After years of battling with the onslaught of her husband's Multiple Sclerosis, Mary stumbled on a little known doctor in New York City, Dr. Bernard Bihari. Many people were making very bold claims about his work on the Internet. They claimed that Dr. Bihari knew how to stop every type of MS from progressing. Even better, it was claimed that he could help everyone with an autoimmune disorder, ranging from psoriasis to AIDS. It was claimed that Dr. Bihari could help them with Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN). Eventually, Mary's husband took a leap of faith and put Dr. Bihari's work to the test. LDN worked. It stopped his MS from progressing. Her uncle with Parkinson's Disease also tried it. Again LDN worked. It stopped his Parkinsons from progressing. Since September 2002, a world-wide campaign has ignited with passionate momentum, to get the already FDA-approved drug medically recognized for treating MS and all autoimmune disorders. LDN is cheap and has no known side effects. The ambition is for LDN to hit the masses and improve the lives of millions. The trials are near, making this a very exciting time for the LDN community and everyone who suffers from an autoimmune disorder.

Mar. 8, 2007

Posted by Jane Anderson under Uncategorized, Daily Journal

Naltrexone - a Medical Dictionary, Bibliography, and Annotated Research Guide to Internet References

Its target audience is geared to physicians and lay people alike.

Icon Health Publications, this is the blurb for the book at Barnes and Noble:

Synopsis In March 2001, the National Institutes of Health issued the following warning: "The number of Web sites offering health-related resources grows every day. Many sites provide valuable information, while others may have information that is unreliable or misleading." Furthermore, because of the rapid increase in Internet-based information, many hours can be wasted searching, selecting, and printing. Since only the smallest fraction of information dealing with naltrexone is indexed in search engines, such as www.google.com or others, a non-systematic approach to Internet research can be not only time consuming, but also incomplete. This book was created for medical professionals, students, and members of the general public who want to conduct medical research using the most advanced tools available and spending the least amount of time doing so.

Mar. 8, 2007

Posted by Jane Anderson under Uncategorized, Daily Journal

Naltrexone and Alcoholism Treatment: Treatment Improvement Protocol

Its target audience is geared to physicians and lay people alike.

Edited by Stephanie S. O'Malley, this is the blurb for the book at Barnes and Noble:

Synopsis

Mar. 8, 2007

Posted by Jane Anderson under Uncategorized, Daily Journal

Opioids, Bulimia, and Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Its target audience is

, this is the blurb for the book at Barnes and Noble:

Synopsis